The World’s Most Powerful Passports (2015)

uk passport

British passport was ranked to be one of the most powerful passports in the world. The research is conducted by by transport search comparison site GoEuro. British passport comes along with others on the top spot for being the “most powerful” passport on the basis of no visa requirement in entering other countries.

The World’s Most Powerful Passports Are:

  1. Sweden, Finland, Germany, United Kingdom and USA – 174 Visa free Countries
  2. Denmark and Canada – 173 Visa free Countries
  3. Spain, Belgium, Netherlands, France, Portugal, Japan and Italy – 172 Visa free Countries
  4. Norway, Austria, Ireland – 171 Visa free Countries
  5. Singapore, Switzerland, New Zealand – 170 Visa free Countries
  6. Greece and Australia – 168 Visa free Countries
  7. Malaysia – 166 Visa free Countries
  8. Iceland – 165 Visa free Countries
  9. Czech Republic and Hungary – 162 Visa free Countries
  10. Slovakia – 161 Visa free Countries

The World’s 10 Worst Passports Are:

93. Afghanistan – 23

92. Iraq – 31

91. Somalia – 32

91. Pakistan – 32

90. Palestinian Territory – 36

90. Eritrea – 36

89. Nepal – 37

88. Sudan – 38

88. Sri Lanka – 38

88. Lebanon – 38

***

About the Author:

Don Magsino MBA is a student of Oxford Brookes University at Post-Graduate Degree in Law in Oxford, England, UK. He is a graduate of Ateneo De Manila University Graduate School of Business. He is a qualified and a practicing Immigration Lawyer in the UK. His mobile phone is 07446888377 / Direct Line: 0207 316 3027 Email is don@stanfordlawassociates.co.uk. His London office is located at Regus, 239 Kensington High Street, London W8 6SN. He is accredited by the Law Society in England and Wales and regulated by the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) Level 3: highest level in immigration professionals. He has represented clients in the First-tier Tribunal, Immigration Detention Courts and Deportation and Bail Hearings and to the Upper Tribunal and won many difficult cases in immigration law in the United Kingdom.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s